Handmade Network»Forums
Andre
15 posts
Post your C/C++ macro tricks
GNU's online docs on the C Preprocessor are pretty thorough if you're interested in learning about the kinds of things that macros can do. Even if you only ever use MSVC, there's lots of good info there.
Simon Anciaux
1108 posts
Post your C/C++ macro tricks
Does anyone knows how Jonathan Blow's defer macro works ? Example of how he uses it at the end of this blog post.
1
2
auto name = filenames[i];
defer { gamelib_free_string(name); };


I found those two pages that show how to make defer macros, but I'm interested to know how Jonathan's curly braces syntax works.
http://the-witness.net/news/2012/11/scopeexit-in-c11/
http://www.gingerbill.org/article/defer-in-cpp.html
TM
13 posts
Post your C/C++ macro tricks
mrmixer
Does anyone knows how Jonathan Blow's defer macro works ? Example of how he uses it at the end of this blog post.
1
2
auto name = filenames[i];
defer { gamelib_free_string(name); };


I found those two pages that show how to make defer macros, but I'm interested to know how Jonathan's curly braces syntax works.
http://the-witness.net/news/2012/11/scopeexit-in-c11/
http://www.gingerbill.org/article/defer-in-cpp.html

You typically need a dummy struct and an operator overload to do this.
I think he is doing this:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
struct DEFER_TAG {};
template< class Func >
ScopeExit< Func > operator+( DEFER_TAG, Func&& func )
{
    return MakeScopeExit< Func >( std::forward< Func >( func ) );
}

#define defer auto STRING_JOIN2(scope_exit_, __LINE__) = DEFER_TAG() + [&]()

This enables you to have curly brackets after the macro, which is actually the definition of a lambda function which is then used to construct a ScopeExit object, which executes it at the end of the scope.
Simon Anciaux
1108 posts
Post your C/C++ macro tricks
Edited by Simon Anciaux on Reason: Was missing a line
Thanks.
Here is the complete code:
 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
#include <utility>
template <typename F>
struct Defer {
    Defer( F f ) : f( f ) {}
    ~Defer( ) { f( ); }
    F f;
};

template <typename F>
Defer<F> makeDefer( F f ) {
    return Defer<F>( f );
};

#define __defer( line ) defer_ ## line
#define _defer( line ) __defer( line )

struct defer_dummy { };
template<typename F>
Defer<F> operator+( defer_dummy, F&& f )
{
    return makeDefer<F>( std::forward<F>( f ) );
}

#define defer auto _defer( __LINE__ ) = defer_dummy( ) + [ & ]( )
Andrew Bromage
183 posts / 1 project
Research engineer, resident maths nerd (Erdős number 3).
Post your C/C++ macro tricks
Edited by Andrew Bromage on
A variant on the X macro is the "header file of macro calls", which I learned from the Clang source code. I'm very much a convert to this style of boilerplate-scrapping, and it's saved my bacon a few times.

Here's an example from Homebrew OS. The interrupt table is kind of complex, because it has to deal with machine exceptions/traps, hardware interrupts, and software-defined interrupts. For some traps, the CPU pushes extra information onto the stack (e.g. page fault pushes information about the memory access onto the stack), so the stack frame may not be the same in all cases. Some traps need special care (e.g. non-maskable interrupts or the machine-check exception).

To handle all the complexity, I define the interrupt table a header file which contains a big block of macro calls, called interrupt_table.inc:

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
TRAP(0x00,__handle_de)
TRAP_SPC(0x01,__handle_db)
TRAP_IST2(0x02,__handle_nmi)
USER_TRAP(0x03,__handle_np)
USER_TRAP(0x04,__handle_of)
USER_TRAP(0x05,__handle_br)
TRAP(0x06,__handle_ud)
TRAP(0x07,__handle_nm)
TRAP_IST1(0x08,__handle_df)
TRAP(0x09,__handle_fpu_of)
TRAP_ERR(0x0a,__handle_ts)
TRAP_IST1(0x0b,__handle_np)
TRAP_IST1(0x0c,__handle_ss)
TRAP_IST1(0x0d,__handle_gp)
TRAP_SPC(0x0e,__handle_pf)
TRAP(0x0f,__handle_trap_0f)
TRAP(0x10,__handle_mp)
TRAP_ERR(0x11,__handle_ac)
TRAP_IST1(0x12,__handle_mc)

// ...and so on for all 256 possible interrrupts...

INTERRUPT(0xf8)
INTERRUPT(0xf9)
INTERRUPT(0xfa)
TRAP(0xfb,__handle_ipi_slow)
TRAP(0xfc,__handle_ipi_fast)
TRAP(0xfd,__handle_apic_error)
TRAP_SPC(0xfe,__handle_apic_spurious)
TRAP(0xff,handle_ipi_reschedule)


To use this, you do a bunch of #defines to say what all the cases mean, then #include the file.

So, for example, here is the code to set up the interrupt descriptor table (in C):

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
#define TRAP_IST1(n, f) \
    extern void f(); \
    idt_set_trap(n, f, 0, 1);
#define TRAP_IST2(n, f) \
    extern void f(); \
    idt_set_trap(n, f, 0, 2);
#define TRAP(n, f) \
    extern void f(); \
    idt_set_trap(n, f, 0, 3);

#define TRAP_ERR TRAP
#define USER_TRAP TRAP
#define TRAP_SPC TRAP
#define USER_TRAP_SPC TRAP

#define INTERRUPT(n) \
    extern void __irq_##n (); \
    idt_set_int(n, __irq_##n, 0, 3);
#include "interrupt_table.inc"


And here is the code to automatically generate interrupt handler stubs (in assembler):

 1
 2
 3
 4
 5
 6
 7
 8
 9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
#define TRAP_ERR(n, f) \
	ENTRY(f) ; \
	INT_HANDLER_BODY(n, handle_trap)

#define TRAP(n, f) \
	ENTRY(f) ; \
	pushq $0 ; \
	INT_HANDLER_BODY(n, handle_trap)

#define INTERRUPT(irqn) \
	ENTRY(__irq_##irqn) ; \
	pushq $0 ; \
	INT_HANDLER_BODY(irqn, handle_interrupt)

#define USER_TRAP TRAP

// We don't want automatically-generated stubs for these cases.
#define TRAP_SPC(n, f)
#define TRAP_IST1(n, f)
#define TRAP_IST2(n, f)
#define USER_TRAP_SPC(n, f)

#include "interrupt_table.inc"


The reason why this approach work well is that there are 256 cases which need to be kept consistent between different source files, even written in different languages. The "header file of macro calls" keeps it all in one place.