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77 posts / 1 project
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 4 weeks ago Edited by Dawoodoz on July 29, 2020, 8:42 a.m.
It seems like all code editors available for Linux are either quirky command line tools where you cannot copy using Ctrl-C (because that would kill the program), or a bloated web application dynamically transpiling into JavaScript only so that it can sand-box itself inside of a full copy of a web browser taking up hundreds of megabytes and leaving old versions of the browser behind when it updates.

Just need a stable light-weight editor with multi-document tabs, syntax coloring, file browser on the side and recursive folder search and replace.
44 posts
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 4 weeks ago
I mainly use vim but occasionally use kate as a backup from time to time. It has most of the features you are asking for. If you happen to be running KDE the dependencies will be minimal.

Here is a small project worth keeping an eye on https://github.com/rxi/lite and additional plugins for it https://github.com/rxi/lite-plugins. Not sure if it has recursive search or not.
Igor Morgado
5 posts
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 4 weeks ago Edited by Igor Morgado on July 29, 2020, 10:24 a.m.
Dawoodoz
It seems like all code editors available for Linux are either quirky command line tools where you cannot copy using Ctrl-C (because that would kill the program), or a bloated web application dynamically transpiling into JavaScript only so that it can sand-box itself inside of a full copy of a web browser taking up hundreds of megabytes and leaving old versions of the browser behind when it updates.

Just need a stable light-weight editor with multi-document tabs, syntax coloring, file browser on the side and recursive folder search and replace.


vim fits all that criteria. Even Ctrl-C if you feel that is the only right way to do it.

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2
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inoremap <C-v> <ESC>"+pa
vnoremap <C-c> "+y
vnoremap <C-x> "+d
77 posts / 1 project
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 4 weeks ago
igormorgado
Dawoodoz
It seems like all code editors available for Linux are either quirky command line tools where you cannot copy using Ctrl-C (because that would kill the program), or a bloated web application dynamically transpiling into JavaScript only so that it can sand-box itself inside of a full copy of a web browser taking up hundreds of megabytes and leaving old versions of the browser behind when it updates.

Just need a stable light-weight editor with multi-document tabs, syntax coloring, file browser on the side and recursive folder search and replace.


vim fits all that criteria. Even Ctrl-C if you feel that is the only right way to do it.

1
2
3
inoremap <C-v> <ESC>"+pa
vnoremap <C-c> "+y
vnoremap <C-x> "+d


I should try it then.
Mārtiņš Možeiko
2145 posts / 1 project
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 4 weeks ago
There's also Sublime Text, Geany and CodeLite that fit these requirements.
77 posts / 1 project
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 3 weeks ago
mmozeiko
There's also Sublime Text, Geany and CodeLite that fit these requirements.


I'll try CodeLite next then.
Igor Morgado
5 posts
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 3 weeks ago
Dawoodoz
mmozeiko
There's also Sublime Text, Geany and CodeLite that fit these requirements.


I'll try CodeLite next then.


BTW, vim isn't a editor to "try" you pick it and use it for life. Isn't it easy to start, since it's too different of actual paradigm of "code editors".

But, IMHO is worth it.

There is also emacs...
56 posts
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 3 weeks ago
I came here to also recommend rxi's lite, it's the cleanest and most user friendly text editor I found in a while.
Miles
89 posts / 3 projects
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 3 weeks ago
igormorgado
BTW, vim isn't a editor to "try" you pick it and use it for life. Isn't it easy to start, since it's too different of actual paradigm of "code editors".

In other words, vim is a cult for people who succumb easily to the sunk cost fallacy.
77 posts / 1 project
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 3 weeks ago
Guntha
I came here to also recommend rxi's lite, it's the cleanest and most user friendly text editor I found in a while.


The interface does look neat and Lua scripting sounds like a good middle ground between resource effective and flexible.
Igor Morgado
5 posts
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 2 weeks ago
notnullnotvoid
igormorgado
BTW, vim isn't a editor to "try" you pick it and use it for life. Isn't it easy to start, since it's too different of actual paradigm of "code editors".

In other words, vim is a cult for people who succumb easily to the sunk cost fallacy.


As emacs. But as you can see, Casey's productivity is far high using it. The same is applied to vim.

I have tried many simple/IDE editors and I always return to vim.
Miles
89 posts / 3 projects
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 2 weeks ago
igormorgado
As emacs. But as you can see, Casey's productivity is far high using it.

Nah, not really. His productivity with emacs isn't noticeably higher than any other programmer using any other common text editor.
Amin Mesbah
3 posts
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 2 weeks ago
Geany falls into neither the quirky command line nor the bloated javascript category. I find it comparable to notepad++.
6 posts
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 1 week ago Edited by Aphetres on Aug. 17, 2020, 4:32 a.m.
notnullnotvoid
igormorgado
BTW, vim isn't a editor to "try" you pick it and use it for life. Isn't it easy to start, since it's too different of actual paradigm of "code editors".

In other words, vim is a cult for people who succumb easily to the sunk cost fallacy.



notnullnotvoid
igormorgado
As emacs. But as you can see, Casey's productivity is far high using it.

Nah, not really. His productivity with emacs isn't noticeably higher than any other programmer using any other common text editor.


Ow! I just cut myself on the edginess of your posts. lol

The reason vim is one of the most popular editors, is because you can find it on every platform. Cross platform programmers don't want to learn a new editor every time they switch platform. Some programmers are just passing ships in the night on the OS they use, so they learn the editors that will always be there. ed, vi, vim, if you know all three you will have a familiar editor on every platform.

As much as I try, I would never be as fast as Casey using any editor.

igormorgado
notnullnotvoid
igormorgado
BTW, vim isn't a editor to "try" you pick it and use it for life. Isn't it easy to start, since it's too different of actual paradigm of "code editors".

In other words, vim is a cult for people who succumb easily to the sunk cost fallacy.


As emacs. But as you can see, Casey's productivity is far high using it. The same is applied to vim.

I have tried many simple/IDE editors and I always return to vim.


Emacs I would advise against. Its default config gives people RSI. Vim does not give you RSI.

See this thread from an old emacs fan who damaged her hands:
https://twitter.com/freebsdfrau/status/1288102587279917056

I used vim for a couple of years, but found it too complicated and never got good with it. I was always thinking about what keys to push next. Then I got the simple bug due to the Handmade Hero influence and and moved to ed(1) which is vi's predecessor, vi is vim's predecessor. ed(1) is so simple it has just 8 man pages and no config file, by comparison to master vim, you must read > 2000 pages.

The reason ed(1) is so simple is because it doesn't replicate anything that is already offered by the OS. It has a filter command and with it all the programs that are installed on Unix/Linux become your IDE. This is good if you are on Linux and know it well or want to know it well. Not so good if you are on Windows I imagine.

Someone above said they don't like editors that won't die when you press Ctr-C. That is because of the filter command in ed, vi, vim, You can start programs running using the filter command in ed, vi, or vim, and if the program misbehaves, you can kill it without killing your editor.


Miles
89 posts / 3 projects
Finding a lightweight but powerful code editor for Linux
2 months, 1 week ago
Aphetres
Ow! I just cut myself on the edginess of your posts.

My posts have about as much edge as safety scissors. If you manage to cut yourself on that, I can't be held liable.
Aphetres
The reason vim is one of the most popular editors, is because you can find it on every platform.

Indeed, the advantage of vim is that it's available out of the box on virtually every linux distro (barring maybe android/chromeos/etc.) and runs in the terminal so you can use it in headless environments. That's about where its advantages end. If you're not a sysadmin, or otherwise finding yourself doing that kind of work, there is literally no reason to ever touch vim.
Aphetres
As much as I try, I would never be as fast as Casey using any editor.

That sounds like a you problem.